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The Stars Promise Death

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: Chapter One. FROM the lounge car of the Shore Express, Lamont Cranston watched the meadows slither by as the speedy streamliner ate up the last few miles of its run to Seaview City. Ahead, jagged in the afternoon haze that was creeping in from the ocean, the skyline of the resort hotel was growing like a school of leviathans rearing from the deep. Perhaps the scene fascinated Cranston, but Margo Lane wasn?t watching it at all. Rather annoyed by the proximity of ...

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To Whom This May Come

By: Edward Bellamy

IT is now about a year since I took passage at Calcutta in the ship Adelaide for New York. We had baffling weather till New Amsterdam Island was sighted, where we took a new point of departure. Three days later, a terrible gale struck us. Four days we flew before it, whither, no one knew, for neither sun, moon, nor stars were at any time visible, and we could take no observation. Toward midnight of the fourth day, the glare of lightning revealed the Adelaide in a hopeles...

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Australian Legendary Tales

By: Katie Langloh Parker

Preface -- Introduction -- Dinewan the Emu, and Goomblegubbon the Bustard -- The Galah, and Oolah the Lizard -- Bahloo the Moon and the Daens -- The Origin of the Narran Lake -- Gooloo the Magpie, and the Wahroogah -- The Weeoonibeens and the Piggiebillah -- Bootoolgah the Crane and Goonur the Kangaroo Rat, the Fire Makers -- Weedah the Mocking Bird -- The Gwineeboos the Redbreasts -- Meamei the Seven Sisters -- The Cookooburrahs and the Goolahgool -- The Mayamah -- The ...

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Playful Poems

By: Henry Morley

Introduction: The last volume of these ?Companion Poets? contained some of Chaucer?s Tales as they were modernised by Dryden. This volume contains more of his Tales as they were modernised by later poets. In 1841 there was a volume published entitled, ?The Poems of Geoffrey Chaucer Modernized.? Of this volume, when it was first projected, Wordsworth wrote to Moxon, his publisher, on the 24th of February 1840: ?Mr. Powell, my friend, has some thought of preparing for publ...

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Poetical Sketches

By: William Blake

Excerpt: To Spring O Thou with dewy locks, who lookest down Thro? the clear windows of the morning, turn Thine angel eyes upon our western isle, Which in full choir hails thy approach, O Spring! The hills tell each other, and the list'ning Valleys hear; all our longing eyes are turned Up to thy bright pavilions: issue forth, And let thy holy feet visit our clime.

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Expositions of Holy Scripture

By: Alexander Maclaren

Excerpt: WHAT ?THE GOSPEL? IS THE beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Mark i. 1 My purpose now is to point out some of the various connections in which the New Testament uses that familiar phrase, ?the gospel,? and briefly to gather some of the important thoughts which these suggest. Possibly the process may help to restore freshness to a word so well worn that it slips over our tongues almost unnoticed and excites little thought. The history of the word in the New ...

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The Fate Joss

By: Maxwell Grant

CHINATOWN'S lights were aglow. Beneath the sultry night they formed an exotic glare throughout this bizarre section of Manhattan. A city within a city, Chinatown was a splash of Oriental splendor centered within drab surroundings. Blobbed blackness fringed the Chinese quarter. To those who approached Chinatown's center, there were darkened stretches to be passed through, secluded thoroughfares that gave no indication of the brilliance that lay ahead. To ordinary visitors...

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The Murder of Agrippina

By: Publius Cornelius (Gaius) Tacitus

Excerpt: 1. IN the year of the consulship of Caius Vipstanus and Caius Fonteius [A.D. 59], Nero deferred no more a long meditated crime. Length of power had matured his daring, and his passion for Poppaea daily grew more ardent.

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Ernest Maltravers

By: Edward Bulwer Lytton

Preface: HOWEVER numerous the works of fiction with which, my dear Reader, I have trespassed on your attention, I leave published but three, of any account, in which the plot has been cast amidst the events, and coloured by the manner, of our own times. The first of these, Pelham, composed when I was little more than a boy, has the faults, and perhaps the merits, natural to a very early age,?when the novelty itself of life quickens the observation,?when we see distinctly...

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It Happened in Egypt

By: Charles Norris Williamson

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE SECRET AND THE GIRL. The exciting part began in Cairo; but perhaps I ought to go back to what happened on the Laconia, between Naples and Alexandria. Luckily no one can expect a man who actually rejoices in his nickname of ?Duffer? to know how or where a true story should begin. The huge ship was passing swiftly out of the Bay of Naples, and already we were in the strait between Capri and the mainland. I had come on deck from the smoking?room for ...

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The Tragedy of Puddnhead Wilson: And the Comedy Those Extraordinar...

By: Mark Twain

Excerpt: A Whisper To The Reader. There is no character, howsoever good and fine, but it can be destroyed by ridicule, howsoever poor and witless. Observe the ass, for instance: his character is about perfect, he is the choicest spirit among all the humbler animals, yet see what ridicule has brought him to. Instead of feeling complimented when we are called an ass, we are left in doubt.

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The Captain's Doll

By: David Herbert Lawrence

Excerpt: ?Hannele!? ?Ja?a.? ?Wo bist du?? ?Hier.? ?Wo dann?? Hannele did not lift her head from her work. She sat in a low chair under a reading?lamp, a basket of coloured silk pieces beside her, and in her hands a doll, or mannikin, which she was dressing. She was doing something to the knee of the mannikin, so that the poor little gentleman flourished head downwards with arms wildly tossed out. And it was not at all seemly, because the doll was a Scotch soldier in tigh...

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The Golden Chain of Homer

By: Anton Josef Kirchweger

Nature comprehends the visible and invisible Creatures of the Whole universe. What we call Nature especially, is the universal fire or Anima Mundi, filling the whole system of the Universe, and therefore is a Universal Agent, omnipresent, and endowed with an unerring instinct, and manifests itself in fire and Light. It is the First creature of Divine Omnipotence.

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The Beacon of Airport Seven

By: Harold S. Sykes

Excerpt: Chapter 1. A Close Shave AS Royce picked up the flash of the huge revolving beacon at Wayside he breathed a sigh of satisfaction, and slowed his motors fifty revolutions. It had been a tiresome climb to the divide all the way from Airport Six, with gusty headwinds threatening to put him behind schedule. But now the grind of another trip was over. There remained but forty miles from the summit to Airport Seven almost under the light, and a relief crew there would...

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The Haunted Bookshop

By: Christopher Morley

Be pleased to know, most worthy, that this little book is dedicated o you in affection and respect. The faults of the composition are plain to you all. I begin merely in the hope of saying something further of the adventures of ROGER MIFFLIN, whose exploits in Parnassus on Wheels some of you have been kind enough to applaud. But then came Miss Titania Chapman, and my young advertising man fell in love with her, and the two of them rather ran away with the tale.

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Areopagitica

By: John Milton

They, who to states and governors of the commonwealth direct their speech, high court of parliament! or wanting such access in a private condition, write that which they foresee may advance the public good; I suppose them, as at the beginning of no mean endeavour, not a little altered and moved inwardly in their minds; some with doubt of what will be the success, others with fear of what will be the censure; some with hope, others with confidence of what they have to spe...

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The Flirt

By: Booth Tarkington

THE FLIRT CHAPTER ONE: Valentine Corliss walked up Corliss Street the hottest afternoon of that hot August, a year ago, wearing a suit of white serge which attracted a little attention from those observers who were able to observe anything except the heat. The coat was shaped delicately; it outlined the wearer, and, fitting him as women’s clothes fit women, suggested an effeminacy not an attribute of he tall Corliss. The effeminacy belonged all to the tailor, an artist p...

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Myne Eerste Vlerken

By: Eugeen Edward Stroobant

Excerpt: U allen, myne vrienden, zy dit myn eerste werkje opgedragen. Door het lot van u verwyderd, wil ik u hetzelve tot eene gedachtenis laten. Gy alleen, die weet hoe weinige ledige oogenblikken myne noodzakelyke en ernstige bezigheden my overlaten, gy alleen zult het geringe aenbelang myner eerste voortbrengselen verschoonen. Eenige der in dit bundeltje vervatte stukjes zyn niet van eigene vinding, maar slechts door my in het nederduitsch overgebragt; zulkdanige zyn:...

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The Deluge

By: David Graham Phillips

Excerpt: I. MR. BLACKLOCK. When Napoleon was about to crown himself?so I have somewhere read?they submitted to him the royal genealogy they had faked up for him. He crumpled the parchment and flung it in the face of the chief herald, or whoever it was. ?My line,? said he, ?dates from Montenotte.? And so I say, my line dates from the campaign that completed and established my fame?from ?Wild Week.?

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The Stars Are Still There

By: Stewart Edward White

Excerpt: All my life, since I grew old enough to, make my own living, I have done so as a professional writer. That means the publication of between forty and fifty volumes of fiction, history and travel, aside from more short stories and articles than I can remember. Therefore I have a fair idea of how the public reacts; and I know that when any book calls out, over a period of four years, an average of half a dozen letters a day, the letters themselves have significanc...

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